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The nods behind our new logo

Since we started almost 7 years ago, our purpose has been to change the way we look at mathematics to promote a more competent society.

Although our history is still short, Innovamat has evolved a lot thanks to research, permanent contact with the classroom, and the continuous feedback we receive from you, the more than 18,000 teachers in 9 countries who use our proposal. Year after year, we have been improving to continue providing the best learning experiences for your students.

We recently asked ourselves: if Innovamat has changed so much on the inside, why don’t we also change it on the outside? So we decided to “change the way we look” at our logo, the one that accompanies you every time you open the classroom manager, browse through a guide or watch a training session. And with that change, we have given it a twist by adding several mathematical “nods”, thus endowing it with that mathematical spirit that characterizes us so much. Here we present, with great enthusiasm, our new logo:

Before continuing with this post, see if you can find the 3 mathematical nods it hides. If so, we encourage you to share it on social media with the hashtag #welovemath.

Now, we explain the nods behind the new logo!

Nod 1: the connection of all mathematical knowledge

Our new logo is a front view of a spiral or spring.

As you know, mathematical content must be discovered following a spiral sequence of rich activities, followed by practice to develop fluency, and not as closed units that begin and end. In this way, we introduce concepts gradually and revisit them over time, building on prior knowledge and fostering connections. This concept of “spiral” or “helicoid” trajectories or curriculums was already proposed by Bruner in 2009 and Harden and Stamper in 1999.

At Innovamat we have developed a didactic sequence for learning mathematics that allows us to understand how mathematical content is sequenced. If you want to know more about our teaching sequence, we recommend this post.

Nod 2: a connection with geometry

If we empty our logo, we can see that it is made up of several circles and tangent lines, and all of these elements have proportional measurements. If you take a closer look, the dot that is separated, at the top right, is the dot of an “i”. From the radius of this circumference as a unit, we have constructed the measurements of the rest of the elements of the logo.

In fact, we did the first proofs of concept for the logo with Geogebra.

Our logo is not static. It forms a spiral that compresses and extends like a spring. And what happens when this happens? In its compressed version, the logo fits into a rectangle whose sides meet the golden ratio (that is, the division of both lengths results in the phi number). And in its extended version? Also! There is a connection with a nice mathematical concept.

Nod 1: the connection of all mathematical knowledge

Our new logo is a front view of a spiral or spring.

As you know, mathematical content must be discovered following a spiral sequence of rich activities, followed by practice to develop fluency, and not as closed units that begin and end. In this way, we introduce concepts gradually and revisit them over time, building on prior knowledge and fostering connections. This concept of “spiral” or “helicoid” trajectories or curriculums was already proposed by Bruner in 2009 and Harden and Stamper in 1999.

At Innovamat we have developed a didactic sequence for learning mathematics that allows us to understand how mathematical content is sequenced. If you want to know more about our teaching sequence, we recommend this post.

Nod 2: a connection with geometry

If we empty our logo, we can see that it is made up of several circles and tangent lines, and all of these elements have proportional measurements. If you take a closer look, the dot that is separated, at the top right, is the dot of an “i”. From the radius of this circumference as a unit, we have constructed the measurements of the rest of the elements of the logo.

In fact, we did the first proofs of concept for the logo with Geogebra.

Our logo is not static. It forms a spiral that compresses and extends like a spring. And what happens when this happens? In its compressed version, the logo fits into a rectangle whose sides meet the golden ratio (that is, the division of both lengths results in the phi number). And in its extended version? Also! There is a connection with a nice mathematical concept.

That’s it for the mathematical nods of our logo. Have you found more? Share them with us through social media! Tag us or use the hashtag #welovemath.

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